RuYi power

www.AnitaRosenberg.com

www.AnitaRosenberg.com

A RuYi is the power symbol of authority. It is an ancient talisman typically made from valuable materials like gold, jade, coral, crystal and precious gems. RuYi means “as you wish” and it is a scepter-shape composed of a long handle and a head usually in the form of a heart, heavenly cloud or longevity (Lingzhi) symbol. They can be lavishly decorated with gem stones, power symbols and the Chinese knot of good luck.

My first RuYi was a gift from Hong Kong Feng Shui Master Jill Lander. She gifted it to me over cocktails at the Intercontinental Hotel in Kowloon. I knew it was something special and now my powerful RuYi sits on my desk facing me as I work. Jill sent me a few from her favorite Hong Kong source and they are available for you if you dare!

RuYi Bulletin:

  • Power symbol of business
  • Place in front of you at your desk
  • Provides protection from gossip & back-stabbing
  • Represents health, wealth & long life
  • Multiplies business opportnities
  • Use for career enhancement
  • Gives good fortune

GOOD KARMA SHOP – buy now

Money God

MoneyGod copy

Do you know the Chinese god of great luck & large wealth? 

In China, they love to gamble (I can tell you this because I have been to Happy Valley Race Track in Hong Kong and the Portuguese gambling island of Macau.) The fu manchu-wearing God of Wealth is who they pray to for all their financial needs. How do we recognize him? First of all, he has that distinctive facial hair. He always wears a crown and usually holds a pot (ingot) of gold. Don’t be fooled. There are so many styles it can make your head spin.

Money God quick-tips:

  •  Brings good fortune to business & sales
  •  Protects from poverty in bad times
  •  Invites wealth for the New Year
  •  Use when starting a prosperous business
  •  Removes obstacles
  •  Keeps your business honest
  •  Reminds you to search for business opportunities
  •  Gives positive vibes

Lucky Charms

Lucky Charms

Lucky Charms in Bangkok, Thailand photographed by Anita Rosenberg

Lucky charms are not just a magically delicious breakfast cereal, they are serious talismans worn for protection and good luck. You can hang them on your lucky bamboo or from your rearview mirror. Each amulet reflects a person’s individual beliefs, values, and superstitions. Asia and India are famous for their elaborately decorated vehicles where lucky totems are the focal point. More is more, but they should always be placed in a high position in order to be honored. In Dale Konstanz’s book Thai Taxi Talismans, he explains that cabbies remove amulets from their necks and hang them from their rearview mirror while saying a prayer. They protect the car and passengers during their shift. At the end of the day, the drivers then put the amulets back on as they say another invocation. On the streets of Bangkok men trade amulets, however you cannot own a magical talisman you can only “rent” them. Each person is a temporary custodian of its magic. Traveling is the perfect time to collect your own charms and danglies and of course you can “own” them. After climbing the Giant Buddha during a monsoon storm on Lantau Island to get a photograph (I got an amazing one BTW) I picked up a glass Buddha charm in the gift shop to hang on my rearview mirror. It reminds me of my fantastic adventure. My prayer charm came from Man Mo Temple and not only protects but takes me back to the temple chimes and wafts of steaming dim sum from my first visit to Hong Kong.

Have you brought home a charm for your car and where did you get it?

Money Toad of Man Mo Temple

 

Money Toad at Man Mo Temple

Money Toads are those lumpy bumpy creatures with three legs. Sort of creepy, super powerful. The key to the Money Toad is the coin he holds in his mouth, an amulet that wards off evil spirits and attracts wealth. I first discovered the Money Toad at the tiny crumbling Man Mo Temple in Hong Kong. Built in 1847 on Hollywood Road it is famous for being located across from Ladder Street where scenes from the 1950s movie “The World of Suzi Wong” were filmed. Totally atmospheric, the ceiling is covered with enormous hanging incense coils. You better duck or ashes will hit you on the head and ruin a perfectly good hair day. The temple gift shop is where I purchased my first brass Money Toad. The sales lady told me to place him by my front door for good luck. She went on to explain I should turn him facing out when I leave home for protection. When I return home turn him inward to bring good luck from outside. Every time I visit Hong Kong I go back to Man Mo Temple to pick up a new Money Toad because I completely believe in them.

Do you have a Money Toad and how did you first discover him?

Incense & Fortune Telling

Fortune Telling at Wong Tai Sin Temple with Mable

Consulting sticks (kau cim) with numbers tipped out of a bamboo cup is a popular way of looking into the future. My friend, Mable, taught me how to consort with the spirits at Wong Tai Sin Temple (1921) in Kowloon. Dedicated to the gods of gamblers, this is where we purchased a handful of yellow incense sticks to light in the burner during a monsoon storm while juggling the umbrella. Next we knelt at the main altar while holding our can of fortune telling sticks. Tossing sticks is tricky. You shake the cup while asking the cosmos your personal questions. The stick that magically pops out (it truly does) holds the answer. On it is a number. This number means nothing until you take it outside to fortune teller row. The soothsayer interprets the fortune. Since you are in China you must hire someone to translate. Entrusting you most important life dilemmas to someone else’s explanation is dicey. I recommend you ask only one question. If you ask three like I did you end up paying a lot.

What is your most memorable fortune telling story and where were you?

Ganesh & the Monk of Ta Prohm

My Ganesh dharma began in Cambodia. I booked a room in the Grand Hotel d’Angkor where the service was so impeccable my feet barely touched the ground, and organized day trips to temple relics, to get in touch with a deeper sense of spirituality. It was at the mysterious overgrown jungle temple of Ta Prohm where I received my first Ganesh statue. Ta Prohm (1186) is a truly chaotic and spiritual temple ruin built by Jayavarman VII, dedicated to his mother and his guru. It was here I met the wizened monk who sweeps the steps of the temple to ensure the gods will have a safe passage up the steep narrow stairways. I bought a bamboo cowbell from him and posed for a photo. My father thought at least I was meeting men on my travels! As I left, the monk placed a tiny golden Ganesh in my hand. “He protects travelers and will help you find your way,” he told me as my guide translated. A sort of golden light washed over me in that moment, and then the monk was gone, and I began to wonder… why did he think I was lost?

What is your first Ganesh story?